Horse Girl Problems







For the person who wants to try barrel racing, do it! It is so much fun. It is a sport that gets your blood pumping and adrenaline flowing. Start slow, trotting to the barrels and walking around them to build up yours and your horses' confidence before you ask for speed. As for the sharp corners, there are proper ways to ask to make turning a lot easier.. lift the shoulder up, sit on your pockets, and push with the outside leg. A good coach is always a good idea too. Have fun!!!
Anonymous

^^^


  8 notes01 Oct 14   

Friendly reminder to check out Spooks for all your equestrian fashion needs! 

I’ve been super happy with all my merchandise, perfect for if you want to stand out at the barn or at a show :)


  4 notes01 Oct 14   
I'm getting back into riding after a couple of years of only riding for pleasure, and while my lower body is great, I'm having issues loosening up my upper body while still keeping posture. Any tips on how I could train myself both on and off the horse?
Anonymous

Try to pinpoint where the tension in your upper body is coming from— neck, shoulders, back, etc. Then you can tailor some exercises to your “problem areas” (if you know, feel free to message me again). But overall, in order to have a relaxed upper body you need to have a flexible ankle and be weighted in your seat bones. Don’t clamp with your thighs, and don’t jam any part of your body into place. You want to feel like a jellyfish, soft and spongey, and rely on your lower leg to balance you. Of course, this doesn’t mean sit like a sack of potatoes— still keep your core engaged for this reason, any exercises out of the saddle that target your core will be helpful), and think “tall and open”. Open up your chest by rolling your shoulders back, and your posture will be fine. Sometimes it’s easier to get the “feel” first, i.e. work on being soft and relaxed, and then once you have that you can tweak your posture. Remember to keep your hips open so you’re moving with the horse’s bounce, this will stop your upper body from being too stiff (exaggerate the motion at first if you have to, play around with bouncing on your outside or inside seat bone, etc). Try doing some stretches before you get on to loosen up your neck and shoulders, and when you ride if you find you carry tension in those areas try doing some one-armed riding exercises. Good luck! :)


  4 notes01 Oct 14   
Would you or any of your followers be able to give me some advice on barrel racing? I desperately want to try it out but the thought of the speed and tough angles is intimidating.
Anonymous

Followers, any advice for this anon? :)


  8 notes01 Oct 14   
submitted by: anon

submitted by: anon


  51 notes01 Oct 14   

woooow my inbox blew up haha, I have a ton of questions to get to! Unfortunately I’m kind of crunched for time this week (PSAT prep/HQC prep/riding/regular school/life haha) so I’ll get to as many as I can but it might take a tiny bit longer than usual :( sorry, thanks for being patient!


  5 notes30 Sep 14   
Im just starting out with english im switching from western. What saddle brand would you recommend for a flat or all around.
Anonymous

What’s your budget like? Assuming you want to stick to economical prices, check out Pessoa, Collegiate, Bates, Ovation, Thornhill, Crosby, and M. Toulouse. I’d also really recommend you check out used/consignment saddles, you can find great saddles for lower prices. 


  1 note30 Sep 14   
I've been riding at a stable that's really expensive and far from my house, and my mom says that I can ride at a place that's only ten minutes from my house and it's a lot cheaper so I was wondering should I stay at the pricy place or switch
Anonymous

Depends— you have to consider where you’d be happiest, what your goals are, what the quality is like at both places, how much price/distance matters to you, etc. 


  7 notes30 Sep 14   
have you ever been in a bad accident or witnessed a bad accident while riding?
Anonymous

I’ve witnessed, fortunately I’ve never been in a very bad one myself! 


  3 notes30 Sep 14   
So I tend to really lean into my right stirrup and it causes me to become off balance in the canter and lean into the canter to the right and kind of twists my hips, taking me off balance in the canter and hard to keep with my horse's rhythm. I can't seem to get even pressure into my left stirrup, even if I focus. Any tips?
Anonymous

Try working on strengthening your core and back muscles, so that your balance improves along with it and you can have control over your body placement. I have some exercises that I like that you can message me for, or you can just google some. Yoga is great as well, as it focuses on your core and balance. And going to a chiropractor might be helpful as well, just to realign you to help with any crookedness. 

When you ride, try only dropping one stirrup. Drop each stirrup separately in both directions, just to keep things even. Though since you know you’re right-side dominated, you might find it especially helpful to drop your right stirrup, so that you’re not so heavy on that side and can work on evening out your balance. Also, focus on keeping your shoulders even and open, rather than curling up or slanting to one side. Rather than thinking about leaning into one stirrup or the other, think about shifting your weight to your left seat bone— this will help straighten you out in a more effective manner. Good luck! :)


  9 notes29 Sep 14   
to the anon who scrunches their leg to hold on, I did the same thing but one lesson my trainer had me do no stirrups half the lesson, then the second half pulled out 10 single bills and told me that I had 10 chances to keep the bills between the saddle and myself but whenever a dollar hit the ground it was hers. but I had 10 bills that could replace the other(s) as they dropped. I left with 6$ and learned pretty quick what I was doing wrong and I noticed one leg "stayed" better than the other

^^


  8 notes29 Sep 14   
Helppp. I do the total opposite thing when something goes wrong, i.e. scrunch my leg to "hold on" instead of pushing into my heel.... Happened twice today riding a new horse that needs a super light leg/hands and I kept losing my stirrup. I know what I need to be doing but idkkk how lol thoughts?
Anonymous

Try dropping your stirrups for a portion of your warmup— it automatically hangs your leg in the correct position and forces you to use your thigh and calf rather than having you rely on pinching with your knee. Even with stirrups, every lap around the arena think “long”. Stretch through your calf so the weight is in your heel- use your heels to anchor your leg in place. Grip the saddle with your calves, as if there was a $100 bill between your lower leg and the horse’s side that you couldn’t afford to lose. Take care also that you’re not leaning too far forwards, causing you to lose leg contact and grip with your knee more…stay centered over the saddle. Going around the ring a few times in two-point position also helps elongate your leg and give you a feel for how deep in your heel you should stretch. Good luck! :)


  8 notes28 Sep 14